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Fact or Fiction: Do Eggs Lead to High Cholesterol?

The guilt about eating eggs is fairly pervasive in our society

You’ve all heard the dire warnings linking too many eggs with high cholesterol. Doctors have told patients to stay away from eggs for so long that the guilt about eating eggs is fairly pervasive in our society. From white egg omelettes to egg substitutes, so many of us have been steering clear of eggs that we don’t know which way to turn. However, new studies are emerging that say eggs aren’t so bad. In fact, two eggs a day are considered OK, provided you don’t have any inherent risk factors for heart disease and the like. If you’re a healthy person, consuming eggs each day won’t harm you, scientists say.

Studies show that eggs don’t hike your cholesterol

The movement that once touted foods containing cholesterol actually cause high cholesterol is turning ever so slightly in favor of the egg. Studies show that eggs don’t hike your cholesterol, and they can even have some pretty awesome benefits like preventing cardiovascular disease. Yes, eggs do contain cholesterol, but they also contain lecithin, which is a fatty substance vital for all living cells that works to break down cholesterol and fat. What it does, essentially, is prevent these fats from adhering to artery walls so that they disperse through the body more readily.

Two eggs a day does not worsen a person’s cardiovascular health or increase serum cholesterol.

Lecithin has been proven to cut bad cholesterol (LDL) and increase good cholesterol to prevent atherosclerosis. Those studies have also shown that eating up to two eggs a day does not worsen a person’s cardiovascular health or increase serum cholesterol. What WILL lead to higher cholesterol is consuming too many saturated fats and trans fats in various types of meats and processed foods. So, if you’re trying to lower your cholesterol, stay away from the processed foods which are very high in sugar and sodium. Instead, eat all-natural, freshly cooked meals whenever possible and avoid anything in a package that can sit on a shelf for years. There are many preservatives in these items that can spike your cholesterol when you make a habit of eating them.

That all being said, you can counterbalance the positive effects of lecithin if you microwave or scramble your eggs. This is why it’s best to purchase farm-fresh organic eggs that have the highest amount of this substance in them to begin with, and eat them either poached or sunny side up. Just for a little background, one egg has about 70 calories, with 200 milligrams of cholesterol containing both unsaturated fats and saturated fats. From one egg, you’ll also get lots of vitamins A, E, D, B-12, folate, and riboflavin.

Now that you know the egg isn’t the evil food it was once thought to be, go have one now and enjoy a heart-healthy breakfast!

 

By | 2016-10-19T10:29:57+00:00 May 5th, 2015|Egg Nutrition, Recipes|0 Comments

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